Are Millennials so different from their elders in the workplace?

The millennials are regularly described as employees with a team spirit who have difficulty accepting a hierarchical structure and who no longer view their salary as the only motivating factor but instead are looking for a sense of accomplishment in their work. The portrait often drawn up is that of a generation which is keen to stand out from that of its elders, and which is difficult to pin down. The eleventh edition of the Edenred-Ipsos barometer, conducted in 15 countries (including in the U.S.) among 14,400 employees, of whom 3,500 are under 30, shows that the behavior and expectations of younger employees have stayed fairly constant, contrary to popular belief. More motivated than their elders, for them, the ideal company is having attributes which are actually fairly similar to those cited by their more experienced colleagues. For the company, the issue is not so much about dealing with this generation independently of the others, but rather globally rethinking leadership challenges in an environment which is increasingly digitalized, horizontal and multi-task oriented, taking into account the countries' strong specificities.

Are Millennials so different from their elders in the workplace?